Alice in process…

Instead of the question “Who is Alice?” there are now paths leading to what Alice might come to be…

11 Sep 2013

Glass Houses: Self-Portraits In A Moving Mirror by Kalliope Amorphous

"'What—is—this?' he said at last. 

'This is a child!' Haigha replied eagerly, coming in front of Alice to introduce her, and spreading out both his hands towards her in an Anglo-Saxon attitude. 'We only found it to-day. It's as large as life, and twice as natural!' 

'I always thought they were fabulous monsters!' said the Unicorn. 

'Is it alive?' 'It can talk,' said Haigha, solemnly. The Unicorn looked dreamily at Alice, and said 'Talk, child.' 

Alice could not help her lips curling up into a smile as she began: 'Do you know, I always thought Unicorns were fabulous monsters, too! I never saw one alive before!' 

'Well, now that we HAVE seen each other,' said the Unicorn, 'if you'll believe in me, I'll believe in you. Is that a bargain?' 

'Yes, if you like,' said Alice." 

Lewis Carroll, Through the Looking-Glass, chapter 7.


The following pictures are like those images that even if didn't born as Alice adventures to their authors,
open possibilities inside of us in the soup of alicinatory images
that floats in inner landscapes.
Alice crosses mirrors and swims in herself in tears, and even twists like a kundalini serpent,
 always wandering about the greatest puzzles:
"Who in the world am I?"
If life is a dream, is it possible to awake?
Losing boundaries and daring fixed identities
one metamorphic girl, Alice is a fabulous monster.
If I believe in you, you believe in me, deal? 


Kalliope Amorphous

 Kalliope Amorphous

  Kalliope Amorphous



   Kalliope Amorphous

  Kalliope Amorphous

  Kalliope Amorphous

  Kalliope Amorphous

 Kalliope Amorphous

Kalliope Amorphous

Kalliope Amorphous



"Glass Houses is a series of self portraits exploring the malleability of identity through the use of flexible mirrors. Through the distortion of my physical form, I explore the fragmentation of identity as well as the hidden self which is often underlaid beneath the facade of our physical exteriors. In this project, I confront questions of self-image and the ways in which our interior worlds conflict with our exterior form. How does the image that we present to the world differ from what we see when we look in the mirror? If our desires, fears, secrets and vulnerabilities were manifested physically, what might they look like? 

 To create these images, I capture split-second deconstructions of my own reflection by manipulating flexible mirror boards made from polyester film.The light and color sensitivity of the surface is similar to water, creating a reflection which passes through countless configurations in a fraction of a second."

Kalliope




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