Alice in process…

Instead of the question “Who is Alice?” there are now paths leading to what Alice might come to be…

25 Feb 2012

Alice in Wonderland: With Artwork by Yayoi Kusama - Penguin Classics




Yayoi Kusama



Yayoi Kusama


Yayoi Kusama



Yayoi Kusama



Yayoi Kusama


Yayoi Kusama



Yayoi Kusama



Yayoi Kusama



Yayoi Kusama



Yayoi Kusama



photos: Dani


Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland: With Artwork by Yayoi Kusama is produced in collaboration with the Kusama Studio, Tokyo and Gagosian Gallery.



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Many years later, during a huge exhibition of her work at TATE modern, Yayoi Kusama illustrates Alice. My book has just arrived. It's beautiful! 
The images are are full of energy and the graphic design is vibrant and stimulating. Well, I love Alice and adore Yayoi Kusama. The dots present throughout Kusama's works travels in the pages of the book, like Alice in a world where the boundaries between dream and reality, between text and image are recreated. It defies boundaries of pages playing with some typographic games,  following Alice's transformations.

My favorite images at the moment are the fall of Alice and the pool of tears, both presented bellow. They are pure pulsation,  with Kusama's powerful dots, being suggestive and mysterious. For me the first presents the fall itself instead of Alice following. We can also fall when we look at it.  The second is a crying state instend of Alice crying . 

The book comes with some new pictures and some previous images of her career, making connections between text and images most time not so clear. 
Anyway, it is another exciting meeting between Kusama and Alice.


Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama


"I, Kusama, am the modern Alice in Wonderland", stated in the 60' the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama, who since the 1950s has alicinated psychedelic worlds. In paintings, collages, poems, daring acts, texts, sculptures, fashions, and surprising installations, she shares patterns, repetitions, obsessions, and visions of the infinite.

In the 1960s, the artist went to New York, where she carried out a series of political happenings, under the philosophy “Love forever,” promoting a reaction against the Vietnam War and all authoritarian, repressive, and conservative powers. Some of ehese body paintings and orgiastic choreographies were performed before the sculpture of Alice in Central Park, in 1968. For Kusama, Alice was the grandmother of the hippies.

Kusama arrived in Central Park as the Hatter, with her nude dancers, inviting everyone to drink the tea that was being served under the magic mushroom. Red, green, and yellow dots could represent the earth, the sun, or the moon, according to Kusama. She painted little circles on the bodies of those present, so that people would divest themselves of their outlines to return “to the nature of the universe”, incorporating an almost hallucinatory vision of reality, in an experience that is at once sensory and spiritual.




Pay attention to the graphic design of Stefanie Posavec , one of today’s most creative information patternists. She makes Kusama's dots play around the pages and over the text creating a new and exciting game between pictures and conversations.


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